RSI in Laguerre Time Self Adjusting With Fractal Energy Usage Notes

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TIGER202020

New member
@Hotdog123 Sorry it took so long to get back. The versions used here are based on code written by Mobius. I believe that this thread is where the notes that were captured on how to use the scan and chart. If not this one, there are other threads here that may contain usage notes. Yes, please re-read post #1 & 2 as that's where the notes are.

There is no best way to set up a scan. I have 6 or 8 that I have used over time but they each had specific things that they did. They are proprietary to Theotrade, so I cannot share them. Point being that I don't use them anymore. You are best off using the stocks or Etf's that are most liquid and watch those.

Regarding Gamma: it is only a signal for when not to trade, it is not in and of itself a trading signal, though many use it that way. Gamma that is high means that the product is wound up ready to make a move, up or down. Gamma that is low has signs of an exhausted move. That is really all there is to Gamma with the RSI Laguerre. Your signal will be when the RSI line breaks above 20 with Gamma coming down to go long. Watch it and play with it. It is nuanced and takes time to pick up. It's all about probabilities. If Gamma is high in both Timing chart & signal chart, your break above 20 should be more assured on your 30 minute chart. Hope that helps.
Wonder if anyone has tried it during market meltdown and what is the result. Also, how to combine the reading of RSI and Gamma into a strategy to test its performance?
 
markos

markos

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I used this Scan Code: https://tos.mx/bRLjdq it's long only scan.....I'm wondering how you can do find shorts.
Thx
Sorry @DarthSkar i meant the whole code from the editor, not the link. Time doesn't permit me to do anything but hit and run responses.
Usually there will be a # in from of a line of code. That's called a "comment". You would remove the comment from in front of the short scan and put it in front of the long scan so that TOS doesn't recognize it.
 
markos

markos

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Wonder if anyone has tried it during market meltdown and what is the result. Also, how to combine the reading of RSI and Gamma into a strategy to test its performance?
Hey @TIGER202020 please put this question in a new questions thread. It should get a response then...
 
H

Heloyguerra

New member
How can i add buy and sell signals to this code?
 
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kinetic

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@markos I'm a bit confused on something, your post and the Mobius quotes seem to contradict each other in one area. In your tutorial, you said if FE is above .6, the stock is more likely to continue trending, but Mobius said FE above .6 is more of a compression or sideways action.

Am I misinterpreting something here?
 
markos

markos

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@markos I'm a bit confused on something, your post and the Mobius quotes seem to contradict each other in one area. In your tutorial, you said if FE is above .6, the stock is more likely to continue trending, but Mobius said FE above .6 is more of a compression or sideways action.

Am I misinterpreting something here?
@kinetic Mobius is never wrong. Seriously. Please point out the thread# so that I can take a look at it.
FE is a personal pain to me, I only use it for probabilities. Think about it like this; if FE is moving up and / or above 60, it is charged up for a move, up or down. Basically that is compression. Nothing says it can't move, or has to move at any time. It's about probabilities. When FE is moving down or below ±30 that means that it is probably empty and tired from its previous move, up or down. That doesn't mean that it can't continue down. Remember, an indicator does just that, it indicates. It's probabilities, not certainties. Good luck.

Found this, hope it helps. btw, Chop Index and FE use different math but are the same, functionally.

Definition from TradingView:
The Choppiness Index (CHOP) is an indicator designed to determine if the market is choppy (trading sideways) or not choppy (trading within a trend in either direction). The Choppiness Index is an example of an indicator that is not directional at all. CHOP is not meant to predict future market direction, it is a metric to be used to for defining the market's trendiness only. A basic understanding of the indicator would be; higher values equal more choppiness, while lower values indicate directional trending.
 
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